Should you write a fancy outline for your novel?

Jean's Writing

Maybe- Maybe not.

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It’s your book, you make the rules.

Different strokes for different folks. Me, I’m trying to be more organized in my writing this year. Only time will tell if I’m successful. LOL

However, I find outlining is a bit of a mystery. spirit-1272923_640

Outlining an unwritten book is weird because you don’t know what will happen. It’s not the same as outlining a book read for a class assignment. No the formal process of outlining a book ideais as foreign to me as Spanish or French. I know just enough to embarrass myself.

Last week I announced to my friend, with much excitement,  I’d finished outlining my first novel. I was stumped for a second when she asked me how many levels I used. Huh? Levels? Like in… I, A, 1, a, ii….

None. Nada, zip. I didn’t use any. Instead, I let the story unfold in my head and then…

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Words of Wisdom From Author Kim Cox

The Indie Spot!

Greetings, readers! Today I am welcoming author Kim Cox to The Indie Spot. Kim is sharing some of her experiences as a writer—in her own words! Take it away, Kim…

My Writing Style

writing

Writing Techniques

I don’t think I have any writing techniques. I don’t do any of the things good writers should or are supposed to do. I don’t write every day, don’t set a certain time to write. If there is a certain time, it’s late at night. I seem to be more creative at night, and I’m not a morning person anyway. That may come from working third shift for a while when I was younger.

I don’t have a space where I write. I used to but my home office went away when we made it into a bedroom for my mother-in-law. I think we’d planned to put a smaller desk in my library but…

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Creating that “Killer” Character

A Writer's Path

by Georgio Konstandi

“I shall not exist if you do not imagine me.”   – Vlamidir Nabokov, Novelist/Poet (1899-1977)

From Blanche Dubois to Ebenezer Scrooge, literature has never failed to produce characters that resonate with millions of readers from across the globe. But where did they come from? What ignited the first wisps of smoke of these authors’ imaginative infernos? How do we, as modern-day writers, emulate such success when we sit down, a blank screen before our eyes, fingers at our keyboards?

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5 tips for New Writers

A Writer's Path

by S. T. Sanchez

  1. Don’t be afraid to re-write

Writing isn’t always the simplest to do.  Inspiration doesn’t always strike at the right time.  Whether you are a few chapters in or almost finished, if you need to rewrite go back and do it!  You want your novel to be perfect.  If you need to fix something, no matter how much work it is going to take, DO IT!  Your book will be better because of it.

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3 quick book marketing tips.

Lizzie Chantree

I am starting a new series on my blog from articles I have read during the week. I will post 3 quick marketing tips for authors and they will change each Monday. Let the fun begin!

Lizzie Chantree books Twitter Ad quote

1.   The title of your book.

This may sound obvious, but the title and subtitle of your book also work as keywords on Amazon.  If you can’t use any  keywords in the title, try adding some to the subtitle as this raises the searchable value of your book.

2.  Add keywords to your book description. 

Your book description should draw your readers to your story, but adding keywords here helps new readers find your book easier. The keywords are highlighted here for a book I made up about Romance, travel, exotic beaches and the stars.

For example:

Rose and Alfie ditched their jobs and decided that flying halfway across the world would help…

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Bizarre Things People Say to Authors

A Writer's Path

by Lev Raphael

Nobody tells you that when you publish a book, it becomes a license for total strangers to say outrageous things to you that you could never imagine saying to anyone.

I’m not just talking about people who’ve actually bought your book. Even people who haven’t read your book feel encouraged to share, in the spirit of helpfulness.

At first, when you’re on tour, it’s surprising, then tiring — but eventually it’s funny, and sometimes it even gives you material for your next book. All the comments on this list have been offered to me or other writer friends in almost exactly these words:

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Writing (Un)Awkward Romantic Scenes

A Writer's Path

by Sara Butler Zalesky

**Warning – adult situations and language and potential spoilers for the novel Wheeler, now available on Amazon Kindle.**

I’ve been hesitant to give Wheeler to friends and family or even tell my coworkers I wrote a novel. Why? Like the protagonist, Loren Mackenzie, I only let people see what I want them to see. I keep my cards close to the vest. I’m a Scorpio, it’s who I am.

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Sunday Blog Share: How to explode with ideas for your sequel

Myths of the Mirror

 This is the best article I’ve read on how to come up with ideas for a sequel or series. I highly recommend it for any authors toying with the idea!

How to explode with ideas for your sequel

by Alecia Akkalon

I decided to write a sequel for my WIP, and in days I went from having no idea what it might be about to having dozens of ideas. Here’s how.

I try to avoid writing “how to” posts because I’m generally of the opinion that I know nothing about anything. This post is more “how I got lots of ideas for a sequel”.

(Sorry I deceived you with the title. I feel awful about it.)

I’ve always considered my work in progress to be a “stand-alone with series potential”. That is, the main story question is answered by the end of the book, and at least one of…

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